Calculate How Much You Can Save, and Which Programs You May Qualify for in 59 Seconds Online

Average Client Savings - $13,294


It is important to keep in mind that you tell the truth when being audited by the IRS.  Not only are your taxes being questioned, but your actions and integrity are under scrutiny.  Any false statements can put you in jeopardy.  Internal Revenue Service auditors are trained to observe your behavior during the audit.  If they believe you are being evasive, it will make them suspicious.  Developing a good rapport with the IRS auditor is imperative to a successful, reasonable outcome.

Being audited by the IRS can be stressful.  We tend to talk too much or freeze when we get nervous.  This can often cause the auditor to lean toward thinking something is wrong on your tax report.  Auditors tend to be very quiet while examining files.  This is not an indication that something is wrong.  Do not allow yourself to react.

When you are with the auditor, try not to talk too much.  Every word you say can be used as information that can damage your tax report integrity.  There is no need to instigate a conversation with them.  Answer their questions as clearly and truthful as you can.  Keeping quiet during an audit is the best choice.

Do not forget all the Internal Revenue Service auditors are trained on what to ask about your taxes as well as to observe your body language during the audit.  In short, be careful when you are with the auditor.  When you meet the auditor, be courteous, respectful and polite.  Assure him you are open and ready to cooperate with his requests.  A brief conversation about the weather or sports can lessen the tension.  The auditor may not engage in much conversation as he will be in a hurry to complete the job.  You can assist the process by making sure that all documents are ready and available for him to begin.  The faster the Internal Revenue Service finishes the audit the better.  There will be fewer questions asked and you can breathe again.

Do not try to offer anything (other than coffee) to the Internal Revenue Service auditor.  It can be misconstrued as bribery.  Just let them do their job.  Remember that less talk is the best policy.

You Might Also Like: